How to use Allow, permit or let.

//How to use Allow, permit or let.

How to use Allow, permit or let.

Allow, permit or let?

Allow, permit and let are verbs with similar meaning.

‘to give permission or make it possible for somebody to do or have something’.

Permit is more formal than allow.

Allow is more formal than let:

  1. The college has started a new organization to permit people take part in different social activities. 

The college has started a new organization to allow people take part in different social activities. 

The college has started a new organization to let people take part in different social activities. 

 

2) The plan for parents meeting will allow many parents discuss their problems regarding their children. 

The plan for parents meeting will permit many parents discuss their problems regarding their children. 

The plan for parents meeting will let many parents discuss their problems regarding their children. 

 

3) Will you permit me to pay for the meal?

Will you allow me to pay for the meal?

Will you let me pay for the meal?

 

4) Permit me to show you how to open this bottle. It’s a bit tricky. 

Allow me to show you how to this bottle. It’s a bit tricky.

Let me show you how to open this bottle. It’s a bit tricky.

 

Permit/allow someone + to do something
We use a direct object + to-infinitive after permit and allow:

 

He has not decided yet whether his office meeting will permit him to go on a picnic this weekend.

He has not decided yet whether his office meeting will allow him to go on a picnic this weekend.

He has not decided yet whether his office meeting will let him go on a picnic this weekend.

 

I would not allow a student to have a cell phone in school premises. 

I would not let a student have a cell phone in school premises. 

I would not permit a student to have a cell phone in school premises. 

 

Let someone + do something

We use an infinitive without to after let:

 

[a child to his parent]

Why don’t you let me go? All my friends are going.

We don’t let employees use the office telephone for personal calls.

 

Passive with permit and allow
We often use the passive with permit and allow.

Permit is often used for official public notices:

 

Photography is permitted for non-commercial use only.

 

[talking about a diet]

You’re allowed to eat as much fruit as you like.

We’re not allowed to put posters on the walls.

 

Warning:
We don’t usually use the passive with let:

The children were allowed to do whatever they wanted.

Not: The children were let do …

By |2015-12-04T13:22:13+00:00December 4th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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